Bumble bee rescue

Yesterday was the first day that it had not rained for some time.  The temperature was still low for the time of the year and when I went into the garden to check out the comings and goings in the Wisteria I found a bumble bee prostrate on the fallen flower heads.  It was not dead but it was certainly not very perky.  I guessed she was cold and hungry.

I brought her inside and made up a sugar and water solution and waited until she warmed up a bit.  I put the sugar and water in a saucer as I thought it would be easy for her to reach.

It was, but the saucer was really slippery and she could not grip well.  I’ll have to improve this technique if I use it again.  Perhaps an unglazed pot would have given her a bit of grip.

Definitely a spot of solution on something rough is required.

The warmth was working and she took the sugar solution.  It was really interesting seeing the tongue for the first time. The tongue is red and feathery at the end which is good to soak up the nectar.  Usually the tongue is kept safe inside a sheath which is tucked under its head when not feeding.

The sugar solution replenished her energy level and she was ready for the off!

But beforehand a good grooming session was needed while hanging from the Saxifraga.

The hind hairs are still a bit damp but she is able to start normal feeding.

A little less fluffy but a lot more active!

Bumble bees are gentle creatures and are not aggressive but the queens and females do possess a sting which they can use defensively.

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8 thoughts on “Bumble bee rescue

  1. How clever of you to know what to do to help the bee; I may have to try somethign like this for those that enter the greenhouse and then can’t seem to find the door again. I’ll try to take more images of the different bees that visit my garden so we can compare. Christina

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    • I think the bees are fascinating. I am completely besotted by the bumble bees but I have mason bees in the garden and the huge carpenter bees with their blue black wings are always around. I see different bees when I walk in the woods. It is difficult to identify them but I try and I suppose you get better with practice.

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