A bit of sunshine

Yellow crocus

Yellow crocus

A bit of sunshine in the Charente Maritime and the seasons seem to slide before your eyes.

Wild violet

Wild violet

The violets appear.

Crocus

Crocus

The crocus pop up.

More crocus

More crocus

And up.

Daffodils

Daffodils

Daffodils usually signal the spring.

Snowdrop and clematis

Snowdrop and cyclamen

But there are still plenty of snowdrops in the garden.

Red hazel catkin

Red hazel catkin

The catkins are out.

Plum  tree blosssom

Plum tree blossom

The plum tree seems to be bursting to open its flowers.

Hellebore

Hellebore

The Hellebores are opening.

Bee on Viburnum Tinus

Bee on Viburnum Tinus

The Viburnum is buzzing with bees but the air temperature is only 8 degrees centigrade.  I thought the air temperature should be much higher for them to be so active.

 Winter honeysuckle

Winter honeysuckle

The winter honeysuckle still has flowers but less than before.

Red Valerian

Red Valerian

The Valerian has started to flower – in February?

Cellandine

Cellandine

The cellandine has decided it is springtime, much to the relief of the dronefly.

Celandine and bee

Celandine and bee

The celandine offers its nectar to bee and fly alike.

Wild strawberries

Wild strawberries

The wild strawberries are already flowering along the roadsides and starting to set their fruit.

Pararge aegeria Speckled wood butterfly

Pararge aegeria Speckled wood butterfly

The sun even brings out the butterflies.

European Peacock Inachis io

European Peacock Inachis io

Do they know it is February?

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26 thoughts on “A bit of sunshine

  1. How wonderful! We are having proper sunshine here too. No bees or drone flies yet but my garden has been full of aphids for at least a fortnight already! Bad for the roses and solanum jasminoides but good for the camera. Lots of leaf hoppers and midges about too. Looking forward to the first bee.

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    • Thank you, I have just started to plant down by the trees these past couple of years and the cyclamen are doing well. I am trying to naturalise some bulbs that will lie dormant under the trees in the summer and come out in spring. I’ve still got a lot of ivy to shift though.

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    • I think they are a different kind of cyclamen. The house plant ones have larger leaves and flowers. These ones are much smaller but really tough cookies and go dormant in the dry soil during the summer. They give good ground cover when established.

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  2. Gorgeous crocuses, I am so jealous of your garden. About the bees – they can forage for pollen at 8 degrees centigrade. For nectar foraging they need slightly higher temps of around 12 degrees upwards, though I think that’s mainly because most plants only produce nectar during warmer weather. They can raise their body temperature to be higher than the surrounding air around them. Bumble bees are even hardier than honey bees and can forage at lower temperatures; I’ve seen them busily foraging away during rain showers.

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